As an affiliate for Boatbookings, you will receive 20% of their revenue - effectively meaning your commission will be about 4% of any sales from your referrals.  You also receive 10% of any commissions Boatbookings make on repeat customers who were your referrals. They do have a minimum charter value of 3,000 ($/€/£/etc) before commissions are earned.
Let’s say you have a promotions page where you’re promoting a product via affiliate links. If you currently get 5,000 visits/month at a 2% conversion rate, you have 100 referrals. To get to 200 referrals, you can either focus on getting 5,000 more visitors, or simply increasing the conversion rate to 4%. Which sounds easier? Instead of spending months building domain authority with blogging and guest posts to get more organic traffic, you just have to increase the conversion rate by 2%. This can include landing page optimization, testing your calls-to-action, and having a conversion rate optimization strategy in place. By testing and optimizing your site, you’ll get far better results with much less effort. 
We hold the right to make changes to the affiliate commission rates (at any time without prior notice) including but not limited to: (i) Exclude certain products / categories from earning referral payouts, and/or (ii) Increase or Decrease the commission rate on specific products / categories. We may also run special / limited-time offers or promotions under which you may earn commission rates on products / categories that were previously excluded from earning commissions, or you may earn increased/decreased affiliate commission rates from those set forth above.
If at any time there has been no substantial activity on your account for at least 3 years, then we will have the right, with 7 days’ written notice to withhold the accrued fees for your inactive account, up to a maximum closure withholding of an amount equal to the minimum amount listed in the Payment Minimum Chart for payment by gift card. Further, any unpaid accrued fees in your account may be subject to escheatment under applicable law.
There is a reason why many major merchants prefer to utilize affiliate marketing networks instead of setting up their own infrastructure. Just as the administrative burden can become overwhelming for publishers with multiple relationships in place, it can be too time consuming for merchants as well. Maintaining direct affiliate relationships involves building out an infrastructure to track referrals, calculate commissions, and process payments. While that may sound like a relatively straightforward process, it can become a major investment with plenty of potential complications and liability issues.
There are other alternatives to reducing the affiliate commission. It’s possible to shorten the cookie life, so that the only channel credited with the sale is the last click. The company could opt to only payout the last click, so that an affiliate cookie set prior to the last click receives no credit. A better solution may be to establish weighted payouts to reflect the proximity between the purchase and the affiliate click, but honestly I’m not entirely convinced any of these options is better than reducing the commission. How would you approach the challenges of balancing the marketing budget?

Affiliate marketing has grown quickly since its inception. The e-commerce website, viewed as a marketing toy in the early days of the Internet, became an integrated part of the overall business plan and in some cases grew to a bigger business than the existing offline business. According to one report, the total sales amount generated through affiliate networks in 2006 was £2.16 billion in the United Kingdom alone. The estimates were £1.35 billion in sales in 2005.[19] MarketingSherpa's research team estimated that, in 2006, affiliates worldwide earned US$6.5 billion in bounty and commissions from a variety of sources in retail, personal finance, gaming and gambling, travel, telecom, education, publishing, and forms of lead generation other than contextual advertising programs.[20]
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