Finding what others pay is pretty easy. One way is to go directly to your competitors’ websites and look for an affiliate program landing page there. If they do have one on their site, their base commission payments should be listed. If you cannot find it on their website, try the second way: log into whichever affiliate network they use and search for their program as an affiliate. By doing this, you will be able to find out all of the information that you need for that competitor.
You might notice that when you have been browsing a website looking for something, (for example, a pair of shoes), then you will start to see ads for those shoes when you're browsing the internet. The reason this happens is the cookies on your computer. Alternatively, you clicked 'yes' when you got asked if you wanted the website to remember your username and password.
Although it has a dynamic and well-designed website, PeerFly has a limited range of offers at any given time (around 8,000). On the upside, it does offer good commission/payout rates, lots of FAQs and educational information, and regular contests and reward programs that can substantially increase your bottom line. Based on online customer reviews, Peerfly enjoys a very high reputation amongst participating affiliates.
Cost per mille requires only that the publisher make the advertising available on his or her website and display it to the page visitors in order to receive a commission. Pay per click requires one additional step in the conversion process to generate revenue for the publisher: A visitor must not only be made aware of the advertisement but must also click on the advertisement to visit the advertiser's website.
There is a comprehensive training program showing you step-by-step how to get your business up and running. This is complemented by live coaching three times a week, and a supportive Facebook group with regular live broadcasts from the CEO Dean Holland. There’s access to in-depth traffic training from Justin Brooke, one of the world’s most sought-after online traffic experts.
In February 2000, Amazon announced that it had been granted a patent[18] on components of an affiliate program. The patent application was submitted in June 1997, which predates most affiliate programs, but not PC Flowers & Gifts.com (October 1994), AutoWeb.com (October 1995), Kbkids.com/BrainPlay.com (January 1996), EPage (April 1996), and several others.[13]
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